More Like This...

Recent Posts

Archives

Monday News Roundup

Feb 27, 2012

It’s your last Monday before March! Let’s look at our most interesting pieces of news, architecture, planning, and art from last week:

Block 11 by MEI Architecture
MEI Architecture designed a parking garage in Almere, The Netherlands, that has a facade of plants and panels featuring cultural images.

Chicago Commits to Downtown Bus Priority
A series of bus lanes will link commuter rail stations, downtown, and the Navy Pier. It’s not quite a transitway — despite the branding — but it will speed movement for thousands of passengers.

Re-imagining our Consumer Culture

Minimizing waste, through either cradle to cradle and/or local economies, is crucial for improving our environment and our quality of life.

Nation’s largest public Food Forest takes root on Beacon Hill
After nearly three years of planning, Beacon Hill residents are breaking ground on what will be the nation’s largest public food forest.

Should Cities Embrace ‘Sandwich Board Urbanism’?
Rethinking allowed uses in city rights-of-way can change the look and feel of streets in unexpected fashion—especially when the focus is on more than the ambiance of sidewalk cafes, benches or clocks. One example is the impact of sandwich board signs.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater Now Accepting Applications for Summer Camp
That’s right, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Pennsylvanian masterpiece is now accepting applications for summer residency programs, and lucky high school students who will be ushered into Wright’s chef d’oeuvre will be given the opportunity to “explore one of the world’s most famous and architectural important buildings independently and without the pressure of crowds” and “examine how architecture and design can exist in harmony with nature” through investigation, analysis, and hands-on design projects.

Paradise Parking: Automobiles Reclaimed by Nature
Paradise Parking is a new series of work by American-born, Paris-based photographer Peter Lippmann. The photos capture abandoned cars in a state of complete decay as each is gradually consumed by nature.