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Tuesday News Roundup

Feb 21, 2012

Hope you all had a great long weekend! Here are last week’s best news, art, and design bites:

The Solution to Nimbyism (Seattle Transit Blog)
The Earthscraper – a 65-story, zero-feet-tall building – is the solution to all concerns about height and massing while simultaneously enabling nearly limitless density.

State of Play: The World’s Most Amazing Playgrounds (Popsci)
The playgrounds of tomorrow must offer something that even the most enticing virtual offerings cannot: real spaces that look at least as amazing as anything virtual.

How and Why Does an Architect Become Famous? (Planetizen)
In a fascinating essay in the journal Places, Keith Eggener examines the politics of architectural reputation through the lens of architect Louis Curtiss’s life and career.

Transparency in the Building Industry – Nutrition Labels for Building Materials (Arch Daily)
Transparency Lists are a resource of precautionary measures which breaks down into categories common building materials and the potential dangers associated with their composition.

Before & After: Sad Office for One Becomes Happy Workspace for Two (Apartment Therapy)
Husband and wife engineers convert single office to efficient double office space with room for both of them to work.

Can This Suburb Be Saved? (New York Magazine)
At MoMA, curators and architects seek a way out of the cul-de-sac.

Virtual Tools for CAD (Arch Daily)
Engineering faculty at Washington State University introduce the Virtual Reality and Computer Integrated Manufacturing Laboratory, or VRCIM, offering a unique solution for increasing the effectiveness of CAD-based design and visualization.

Why the Future of Sustainable Cities Rests with China (Planetizen)
China’s massive and growing urban population presents a unique opportunity – while most urban growth in the Western world will take place in existing cities (at least for the immediate future), developers in China must build new cities from the ground up just to keep up with demand.

Luccon Translucent Concrete  (Design Milk)
Luccon is a material developed in the early 2000s, made up of lasagna-like layers of concrete and fiber optics through which light can pass. However, the material is sealed and just as strong as concrete.